SoNo Spaces Featured on The Whiteboard

An article including our SoNo Spaces brand, reposted from The Whiteboard, advancing entrepreneurship in Connecticut.

MAY 2014 | The Whiteboard

Stamford Area Coworking Is Diverse and Growing

By Kim Demers

Coworking is not new to the startup, freelance or techie world. There are more than 780 in the United States (when there was one in 2005), and the trend is growing in all corners of Connecticut. 

Last week, The Whiteboard talked with Katherine Warman Kern of COMRADITY, Karl Heine of SoNo Spaces and Sarah Robinson and Peter Propp of The Stamford Innovation Center and WorkSpace Stamford – four prominent voices in the coworking community in southwestern Connecticut, and members of The Business Council of Fairfield County’s Shared Workspace Initiative.

For many, coworking is the future of how we work.

Why? People are tired of working in cubicles. Coffee shops can get loud and crazy. And, at a certain point, working from home doesn’t work – it can be isolating and then there are distractions. Raise your hand if kids, a pet or spouse hovering near your workspace has ever hurt your productivity.

These are the main reasons why coworking got started, and why the number of shared workspaces has grown substantially in the last two years.

Coworking helps indie businesses, freelancers and startups recapture the best benefits of an office environment, specifically, community, collaboration and inspiration, without giving up the best perks of working for yourself: flexibility, independence and doing what you love to do.

Each place has its own vibe. The beauty of coworking is that it can come in different stripes. Some spaces accept everyone. Many other coworking communities are specialized on entrepreneurs and business startups, innovation, social enterprise or creative professionals, for example.

These spaces are stimulating, inspiring, and fun. Members love to come to work and stay for the increased levels of productivity and community. A community that is helping to grow the local economy.

If you’re starting to think you might need a change of scenery and live in the Stamford area, consider these shared spaces, only some of the 12+ in Fairfield County:

SoNo Spaces

SoNo Spaces, is a vibrant place in the heart of historic South Norwalk, or SONO as it is affectionately referred to, for creative professionals to find their ah-ha moment.

SoNo Spaces
It looks cool, because it is cool.

“We created an open-share environment as an extension of the way our own work styles have evolved,” says Karl Heine, who runs SoNo Spaces with his wife kHyal. The couple had begun to work remotely, from places like Paris and Berlin, and became interested in the share culture cultivating in New York because of the rising cost of real estate.

“We believe there’s a pretty tightly woven relationship between inspiration and education,” Heine said. “Over the years, we’ve hosted New York guests for collaborative events, workshops and talks on a range of topics, including gourmet typography and hand lettering through Push Workshops, as well as special events to bring together the creative community.”

Long before Hurricane Sandy, their North Main Street space had already become an inspiring and trusted gathering place for Norwalk’s creative community. When many were out of power during the storm, Karl and kHyal opened their door to any professional in need of space and a place to charge laptops and phones at no cost. And, SoNo Spaces quietly opened later that year.

Its location close to I-95, Norwalk Harbor and the Long Island Sound, combined with its architectural authenticity, have made SONO a vibrant, thriving community to work, live and play. It’s also a cultural mecca filled with highly-skilled creative talent. SoNo spaces offer access to this creative marketing community, including those in the design, interactive, creative services and tech sectors. The space has been a magnet for businesses that want easy access to recruit top-quality talent, and creative professionals that want to grow alongside like-minded individuals.

SoNo Spaces provide all the technical amenities, as well as hosting a creative, idea-rich environment that inspires networking and collaboration. They offer desk space or private offices on a relatively short-term basis. It is a less expensive and flexible option – and not more space than an entrepreneur or startup team would need.

Walking distance from the Metro North train station, SONO makes it easy to toggle between New York, Connecticut and Boston. Blazingly fast high-speed WiFi, secure 24/7 access, use of their swanky lounge and an open and friendly environment to co-mingle are just a few more of the available perks at SoNo Spaces. Click here for more information.

See the full article here.

MegaGlam Fashion featured in Examiner article on Freestyle Fashion Conference NYC

MARCH 30, 2014 | Examiner

Thanks to Alina Braverman, NY Social Media Examiner, for including our MegaGlam Space Age Yeti jacket in her article on the Freestyle Fashion Conference.

kHyal featured in New York Social Media Examiner

Read the full article here.

 

A Happy Reunion with Andy Warhol Factory Star and renown author and artist Ultra Violet

kHyal with Andy Warhol Factory Star Ultra Violet

Turning a corner yesterday at the Volta New York press preview at 82 Mercer Street, serendipity arrived. There sat Ultra Violet (Isabelle Collin Dufresne) in a special installation of her self portrait mirrors and other work curated by New York’s Culture Shock.

I met Ultra Violet in 1995 when she approached me at a show I was in at Ricco/Maresca Gallery called “CODE” an international new media exhibition sponsored by Microsoft, Apple and Softimage. At the time, my friend and business partner Jackie Lightfield and I had an interactive agency called blowtorch with a sub brand called Art Spark, under which we published interactive art CD ROMs, including Los Angeles artist Bill Barminski’s “Consumer Product.” Jackie had also programmed the fake AI engine in the interactive portion of my sculpture in the CODE show.

Ultra Violet was interested in having us publish her book “Famous for Fifteen Minutes,” as an interactive CD ROM.

Set in the dervish years of the Sixties and Seventies, Famous For Fifteen Minutes is a confession memoir of Ultra Violet. The story recounts of Warhol, a shy, bald, myopic, gay albino from an ethnic Pittsburgh suburb and the “Girl in Andy’s Soup,” Isabelle Collin Dufresne, a.k.a. Ultra Violet, a convent educated heiress from France. Salvador Dali, her companion for five years, introduced her to Andy in 1963. The book won the Deutsche Bibliothek Frankfurt Award, and has been published in 14 languages.

Ultra Violet spent time with us at our offices in New Haven, CT and we visited her at her New York penthouse, in a building that towered over the Guggenheim Museum, going over the materials and learning about the details of Ultra Violet’s amazing life, including her adventures when she worked for and studied with surrealist artist Salvador Dalí.

Ultra Violet was very interested in the MegaGlam Space Age Yeti jacket and “I do what I want” custom dress I was wearing, and asked if I could make something for her in magenta.

I hadn’t seen Ultra Violet since the late 90s, and am looking forward to visiting her Chelsea studio this weekend.

The above description of Famous for Fifteen Minutes was referenced from the Amazon book listing here

Photo by Debra Anderson, Culture Shock, New York.

Women’s Internet History Project

AUGUST 2010 | Women’s Internet History Project

As a proud member of the Women’s Internet History Project, it was great to attend the NYC gathering on August 12th. Thanks to my old friend and colleague, Tery Spatero, for spearheading this organization and the event!

The Women’s Internet History Project

Connect with WIHP on Facebook.

Follow WIHP on Twitter.

More info on the event here.

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